Back to Back Issues Page
Diagram It! - Linking Verbs LINK
June 21, 2016

June 21, 2016

Dear,

Two weeks ago, David, Alice, and I took a trip to the remote and beautiful Boundary Waters Canoe Area. We planned on enjoying four days of swimming in the refreshing lakes, exploring in the woods, cooking over campfires, and sleeping under the stars.

English Grammar Revolution

Unfortunately, the weather didn't cooperate for the first two days, so we stayed in a cabin. When the cold rain finally stopped, we eagerly started our journey (see photo), only to end the day in another cabin, having helped a hypothermic family whose canoe capsized in the middle of a deceptively cold lake. We were disappointed that we didn't go camping, but we were grateful that we were all safe!

In the Grammar Time section, you'll learn what linking verbs are and how to diagram them.

Happy Learning,


Elizabeth O'Brien

facebook follow twitter follow youtube follow pinterest follow

Get Smart

Do you want to learn or teach grammar the easy way? This program contains in-depth lessons and sentence diagrams that will turn you into a grammar pro.

English Grammar Revolution

Whether you're a teacher, a parent, a writer, an editor, a businessman, or just a person who loves learning, the easy-to-follow lessons and diagrams will engage you and make you a more confident speaker and writer.

"Your approach to teaching grammar is awesome! I got an A+! YES! Thank you!" - Danny, Student

Learn more here.

Linking Verbs

, do you know the definition of a verb?

Verbs are words that show actions or states of being.

You probably feel fairly comfortable with the "actions" part of that definition. It's easy to grasp verbs as actions. (If you'd like more help with action verbs, read this page.)

Kristin planted flowers.

John ran a race.

Planted and ran are both verbs that name actions. In this lesson, we are going to focus on the "being" part of the above definition.


States of Being

Verbs that tell us about the state or condition of subjects are called intransitive linking verbs. We call them linking verbs for short.

feels happy.

Elizabeth is a teacher.

Ron Swanson was the manager.

Linking verbs function as equals signs between the subject and a noun or adjective.

= happy

Elizabeth = teacher

Ron Swanson = manager

Feels, is, and was are all verbs that tell us about the state of the subjects (, Elizabeth, Ron Swanson). Feels, is, and was are all linking verbs.

Linking verbs link the subject with either a noun that renames it or an adjective that describes it.

Nouns that come after linking verbs and rename subjects are called predicate nouns or predicate nominatives.

Elizabeth is a teacher.

Teacher is a predicate noun renaming Elizabeth.

Adjectives that come after linking verbs and describe subjects are called predicate adjectives.

feels happy.

Happy is a predicate adjective describing .


Diagramming Linking Verbs

This sentence diagram shows you how to diagram linking verbs.

Linking Verbs

Do you see how the line between the linking verb and the predicate noun or predicate adjective is slanted back toward the subject?

The slanted line helps you remember that the noun is renaming the subject and the adjective is describing the subject. Isn't that neat?

Let's diagram the sentences from above.

Linking

Verbs

Elizabeth is a teacher.

Elizabeth = teacher

Elizabeth is the subject, is is a linking verb, and teacher is a predicate noun renaming Elizabeth.

Linking Verbs

Ron Swanson was the manager.

Ron Swanson = manager

Ron Swanson is the subject, was is a linking verb, and manager is a predicate noun renaming Ron Swanson.

Diagram more sentences with linking verbs on 7.1 of this page.

Look at a list of linking verbs here.

_______________________________________________________________ Are you an educator? Feel free to use this information with your students.

About Elizabeth

English Grammar Revolution

Elizabeth O'Brien is founder of www.GrammarRevolution.com, a company devoted to helping people learn and love grammar.

Through her website, books, and programs, Elizabeth shows people how to teach and learn grammar the easy way. She's on a mission to inspire and motivate people by making grammar fun and friendly.

If you liked today's issue, you'll love Elizabeth's grammar and sentence diagramming programs, which will help you learn or teach grammar through simple, step-by-step instructions and sentence diagrams.

Manage Your Subscription
Back to Back Issues Page